Raising the Standard.

Staff Favorites, Week of March 19th

Graphic created by Mallory Traylor.

Staff Favorites, Week of March 19th

  • Pick of the Week: Ten Conservative Principlesalong with a few other works like the Sharon Statement, for exampleis probably one of the best and most succinct outlines of the conservative philosophy that I have ever read. Russell Kirk, one of the greatest thinkers that the movement has ever claimed as one of its own, does not disappoint with this marvelous and timeless essay. One would be hard-pressed to find a more cogent opus in an equal amount of ink. What follows is an excerpt from the conclusion of the piece. . . ~ Assistant Editor Ross Dubberly

“The great line of demarcation in modern politics, Eric Voegelin used to point out, is not a division between liberals on one side and totalitarians on the other. No, on one side of that line are all those men and women who fancy that the temporal order is the only order, and that material needs are their only needs, and that they may do as they like with the human patrimony. On the other side of that line are all those people who recognize an enduring moral order in the universe, a constant human nature, and high duties toward the order spiritual and the order temporal.”

  • Robert Curry makes an interesting exploration into the adjective, “self-evident” in the Declaration of Independence. Although commonly attributed to Locke’s influence on the Declaration, this turns out not to be the case. ~ Assistant Editor Ross Dubberly
  • Joseph Epstein’s long, but fascinating piece for the Weekly Standard describes the seemingly elusive notion of ‘high culture’ and makes an elegant case for the pleasure to be had in its pursuit.” ~ Assistant Editor Ross Dubberly
  • New York Times article that offers an organized and visual representation of the American Health Care Act in terms of what it changes of Obamacare (not much and not nearly enough). ~Editor-in-Chief Nick Geeslin

Until next week,

— The Editors (Ross Dubberly & Nick Geeslin)